When TV Shows You Enjoyed Before Don’t Have That Loving Feeling Anymore

There’s nothing quite like getting into a new TV show when it first premieres and instantly falling in love with it. A lot of TV shows, whether they’re good or bad, often get the kiss of death by the end of the first or second season if the show isn’t performing well in the ratings game. Most people have to hold their breaths or cross their fingers and hope their show won’t get cancelled.

When a show manages to jump over the cancellation hurdle and it can safely ease into this feeling of being around for many years to come, fans have many reasons to rejoice, as they can enjoy the characters and story for as long as the creators and networks will allow. Unless you encounter a show that has outlived its welcome.

Continue reading When TV Shows You Enjoyed Before Don’t Have That Loving Feeling Anymore

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Beneath the Power Suit

One of the biggest points of both joy and contempt in the comic book world is when a character is redesigned.  This is a fairly common practice; costumes and physical features will receive an update depending on the current market or the artist handling the series.  A perfect case study for this is the evolution of the X-Men since their first appearance in 1963.  From yellow jerkins to shiny armor to black leather, every character in this series has had several make-overs, and not always for the better (see: Kitty Pryde’s various incarnations).

These sorts of updates occur in the video game world as well, often during a console generation shift.  Better resolution and processing speed provide developers with stronger tools to render characters and their outfits.  Classic armor and accessories can be further detailed, and the designs from concept art are better translated to the screen.  Nintendo’s bevy of beloved characters has been through some changes over the years, but these iconic designs have remained mostly stable since their inception.  One odd exception is the heroine of the Metroid series, Samus Aran. Continue reading Beneath the Power Suit

Spread the Word: Newbie Blogger Initiative 2014

Starting May 1st, the third annual Newbie Blogger Initiative will kick off. This is a near and dear initiative to my heart, as it is the reason I started blogging back in 2012.

Every year since 2012, the NBI has gathered for a single month to help get new people interested in game blogging.  Its community-first attitude means lots of experienced advice, people more than willing to check out and promote your new blog, as well as provide an ongoing support network.

If you are interested in blogging for the first time or for starting a new blog, it is an easy way to build up some initial contacts, supporters, and views. #NBI2014 will run for the entire month of May with special events, promotions, and articles throughout. Even if you aren’t interested in starting your own blog, it’s a fun blogging community to get involved with or share with others.

For more information, check out the website. And don’t forget to follow along on Twitter as well!

Doritos Crash Course – A Tale of Anger, Malice and Greed

Have you ever played a game that just drove you to a point of feeling genuine frustration and anger? More than just the “Oh darn I died!” kind of anger or the “Why did you not grab that ledge you were right there!” kind of frustration, either. I’m talking about the kind of rage that makes you turn against your friends and despise the game you are playing. I have been there, and I’d like to take this time to talk about it for the first time in a public setting. This is a tale of the all consuming rage than overtook me during my brief stent of playing Doritos Crash Course. Oh and uh… Don’t take any of it too seriously. Continue reading Doritos Crash Course – A Tale of Anger, Malice and Greed

Why I Still Love Disney’s “The Little Mermaid”

Like a lot of kids, I watched a lot of Disney movies growing up. I still remember seeing The Lion King in theaters, and acting out Pocahontas with my sister when we watched it at home over and over. I saw Mulan in theaters twice — once with my dad, who almost never took us to the movies but actually seemed to enjoy that one. My mom always liked Beauty and the Beast and Cinderella, so those were in heavy rotation at our house, and Aladdin was a big hit when I was young. But my personal favorite was always The Little Mermaid.

What amazes me most about that movie is that all the things I liked about it when I was a kid still hold true today. I liked that Ariel was a daydreamer who didn’t want to stay put. She had this crazy collection of exotic finds from the human world, which she used incorrectly because her dealer was an eccentric seagull. So she brushed her hair with a fork. That was all right with me. Maybe she was a little obsessive in collecting things from the world of humans, but I always liked that she had a secret space all her own for that sort of stuff. She wanted to travel and experience life in another place, another culture, from a new perspective.

The Little Mermaid, screencap 1

I’ve done similar things in my own life. Besides being a little obsessive about my interests, I love traveling and living in other places. When I was 19, I moved far away from home to experience a new city and lifestyle, which was kind of terrifying at that age but ended up being a life-changer. And I’m still a daydreamer. That’s part of what makes me a geek.

But it’s got me wondering whether I always related to the character Ariel, or if it happened the other way around. Maybe The Little Mermaid actually had a really big influence on me, and that’s why I love Ariel so much even today. From watching that movie, I learned that imagination is good. Daydreaming is good. Getting to know other kinds of people is good. And being passionate about other places and foreign things is something that can lead to real adventures, even if not everybody understands why you have that impulse at first.

Even though I loved so many Disney movies growing up, I rarely re-watch them now that I’m an adult. My biggest exception is The Little Mermaid. That’s the Disney movie that still, to this day, feels most like me.

— Ashley

Does the 1990 movie adaptation of Stephen King’s It still…float?

Cover art for 25th anniversary release of Stephen King's It © Cemetery Dance (2011)
Cover art for 25th anniversary release of Stephen King’s It © Cemetery Dance (2011)

A few weeks ago, I wrote an article here about Stephen King and, in particular, the aspiration to re-read his classic, creepy yarn It.  Since then, I’ve done just that, or rather, I’m in the process of doing that. I picked up a copy of It for my Kindle and have been spending delightfully unsettling stints here and there in the small town of Derry, Maine, that has long been troubled by an ominous creature that feeds upon children.

It is a pretty long book, and I’m about a third of my way through the electronic version. Thankfully, it’s all just as excellent as I remember it years ago. Without getting too spoilery, the story of It takes places in two time periods of the same universe – the late 1950s to the early 1960s and the mid 1980s – and it revolves around a close-knit group of friends. In the 1950s, after It appears (again) in the form of a clown named Pennywise and begins tormenting Derry’s children, seven kids who escape Pennywise’s “charms,” band together to fight It, becoming life-long friends during the process.  Continue reading Does the 1990 movie adaptation of Stephen King’s It still…float?