Tag Archives: PC

PC Gaming: Mouse-and-Keyboard or Controller?

I ask this purely out of curiosity. When I got into PC gaming, one of the biggest draws for me wasn’t so much the graphics power — it was the mouse and keyboard set-up!

My first attempt at playing with mouse and keyboard was the first Assassin’s Creed game. That was tricky. I felt like I was performing a masterpiece on the piano (and I didn’t get very far).

When I switched to shooters, I fell in love with the set-up and decided PC gaming was really for me. Using the mouse enhances your precision when aiming a firearm, and it feels incredibly natural to just point and shoot — the same thing you do every day on your computer when you click on something! Playing Mass Effect 2Mass Effect 3, and Borderlands 2 with the mouse and keyboard was really enjoyable.

Later, I even tackled DmC: Devil May Cry using mouse and keyboard, even though the series is really for PlayStation and a good old-fashioned controller. But using the keyboard not only to select a weapon, but also to click a specific move while holding it, was totally fine. DmC is a lot more challenging with the keyboard than Assassin’s Creed was, but by the time I got around to playing it, I was used to those PC controls and mastered them easily.

Now, I prefer mouse and keyboard for every game I play on the computer, no matter what the genre or gameplay style.

Which set-up do you prefer for PC gaming?

Black Desert’s character creation is amazingly impressive!

Black Desert, a new MMO that’s still in closed beta, is a gorgeous-looking game that I’ve just had the privilege to discover. Developed by Korean company Pearl Abyss, Black Desert will deliver a variety of experiences inside of its sandbox atmosphere including open-world combat, castle sieges, and real estate opportunities that will allow a limited amount of houses to be bought by players. The game itself looks beautiful and definitely “next-gen,” which becomes obvious in the latest character creation video. Continue reading Black Desert’s character creation is amazingly impressive!

Episode.26 – Simpleek Stunning

Happy Day, Skype Call Recorder lives again! To celebrate, we have blogger and fan of the show, Simpleek, joining Joshua for Episode.26. The duo chat about gaming, coming from common backgrounds,  life in general and the why everyone LIKES the show, but isn’t IN LIKE with the show enough to leave some of them there communications on the Twitter. Also, with the restored function of Joshua’s Skype recorder, the door is very much open for guest hosts if anyone’s interested. Thanks always for listening!

  Show notes:

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Episode.25 – Green Screens, Guitar Riffs and Godzilla

Ah, 25. This little show is finally old enough to rent a car without any having to pay any extra fees. Returning to the show is the Hall to my Oates and the Pink to my Floyd, the lovely Hannah. Also contained within the confines of Episode.25 is some amazing Godzilla news, more guitar riffs than a rock show and the triumphant return of Incoductalk with pop-tech artist, Rodwin Pabello.

  Show notes:

“What’s in My Head?”

Shoutouts:

  • Rodwin Pabello
  • @byteSprite
  • @HSlamma
  • @IfukubeGodzilla
  • @Kaijucast
  • @ctmurfy
  • @geekforcenet

Feel free to send us your comments, suggestions and questions!

Voicemail/Text Message: (347)-709-0501 or email us at feedback@incoductic.com

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Music is your weapon in Harmonix’s new FPS

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Chroma, Harmonix’s new first-person-shooter, forces you to rely on the music and the rhythm of the game in order to successfully play. Imagine picking a class, hopping into a map, and shooting enemy players in time with the beat of the song in the background, or the only way you can chase your opponent is by timing your movement to the rhythm. Music is the key element that progresses the gameplay.  Continue reading Music is your weapon in Harmonix’s new FPS

Biofeedback Horror Game Monitors How Scared You Become

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Nevermind, a horror game currently trying to reach its goal on Kickstarter, is the first horror game that uses biofeedback to monitor just how scared the player becomes while playing. The more frightened the player becomes, the more difficult the game becomes, in turn, helping the player to manage their anxiety. Continue reading Biofeedback Horror Game Monitors How Scared You Become

If browsing the internet is the Wild West, Feedly is my Sheriff.

Before I began using Feedly a few years ago, I had never used RSS before. Honestly, I didn’t even have a clue what it stood for (Rich Site Summary) or how it could improve my life. Anytime I wanted to check for news, I’d pull up each website I frequently individually, scan their front page to the point that I had last read, and repeat this process throughout the day. That was the sole source of my news since I had yet to join Twitter and my Facebook wasn’t overloaded with links as it is now.

This quickly became a problem: I am an information addict, so checking for news often occurred hourly, if not sooner. That meant that every time I wanted to satiate my hunger, I had to once again pull up the ten to fifteen websites I enjoyed. And boy was I hungry!

I eventually admitted the problem, so I decided to find a solution. I briefly looked at Google Reader, but its interface seemed ugly and loud. One of the major reasons it took me so long to get into Twitter was how overwhelming it felt, and it wasn’t until I found categories and Tweetdeck that I could structure the information so it wasn’t pure noise. Similarly, Feedly helped me organize, tame, and grow my news consumption habit.

These were the early days of Feedly so, despite being feature-rich, it wasn’t as featureful as it is today. I remember beta testing it on my iPod Touch (it was a while before I could afford a smartphone). Nowadays, Feedly is available on iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac. I primarily use it on my PC, but I frequently use it on my Android phone as well.

What exactly does Feedly do? Feedly captures syndicated RSS content from whatever websites you decide to add to it. With its variety of views, customization when it comes to categorizing feeds, and easy sharing options, Feedly is one of the most handy applications I have ever used. I’ve put it to work everyday, multiple times a day, for several years now. I even use it for aggregating podcasts since I no longer use iTunes, though it isn’t really meant for that.

It helps that it is incredibly easy to use if you haven’t before:

  • Go to the Feedly website and click ‘Get Started’.
  • Begin typing in a website to add to Feedly on the left-hand side of the screen.
  • Your best bet is to copy and paste the site URL directly: try ‘geekforcenetwork.wordpress.com’ and give it a shot!

After that, click on Geek Force Network. Feedly will display what GFN’s feed looks like. Once you click ‘Follow’ at the top, you’ll be prompted to sign in with a required Google account. This makes it easier to take Feedly with you anywhere.

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Once you have an account, it is time to add more websites and categorize them. For mine, I use Gaming, Culture, Technology, Sports, and Blogroll as my primary categories.

One of my favorite ‘tricks’ is adding the RSS link to my YouTube subscriptions. That way I don’t have to check YouTube separately and I don’t have a bunch of additional feeds on my Feedly. To find out how to get your RSS link for YouTube, go here.

Feedly is a great tool for bloggers looking to keep up with their community. Rather than use WordPress’s reader, I find it a lot more useful to have everything I read in a single location. Plus, I always felt like I was leaving Google Blogger users out in the cold.

It also helps that RSS feeds are quicker to sort through, since you always have the title and some of the body of the post available to read. As much as I wish it were not true, many websites publish articles that have zero interest to me. Feedly lets me go ahead and clear though out of the way. And for the articles on the fringe of ‘must read’ and ‘won’t read’, Feedly has a handy archiving function to save those to read later.

Since I am a huge fan, I am also a Feedly Pro user. Normally, Feedly is 100% free, but Feedly Pro promises additional features and the ability to suggest new ideas to the developer. It is still a bit early to call it a necessary upgrade, especially at $45 a year, but I don’t mind showing my support.

For Android users, you can get Feedly here. For iOS users, you can get Feedly here.

Let me know in the comments below what you think of Feedly if you haven’t used it before. If you use something else, I would love to hear about that as well!

If you are a fan, don’t forget to add Geek Force Network. Here’s a link so there’s no effort required!