Tag Archives: udon comics

To Be Continued…

In our modern world of streaming media and digital comic books, it’s pretty common to binge on a series and find yourself in a quandary.  Once a series runs out, it’s difficult to stay occupied and entertained during the interim.  But every so often, a major publisher will test the waters and try to add a new vessel to their fleet of comics.  Such was the case in May 2009.

During the run of Street Fighter II: Turbo, Udon Comics pitched a potential new series through bonus stories at the back of certain issues.  Since Cody and Guy tied so heavily into the current plot of Street Fighter, it makes sense that Udon would try to get readers interested in a standalone comic based on Final Fight. Continue reading To Be Continued…

A Darker Shade of Blue

There is a common problem that pops up in long-running series across all forms of media.  After so many issues/episodes/games of good battling evil to maintain the status quo, the antagonist of a series can seem less like a threat and more like a lovable ne’er-do-well who gets into goofy shenanigans.  This trope is especially apparent in prolonged battle shows and comics, where the stakes can only be raised so high by a single villain (see: Dragon Ball Z, Transformers, Power Rangers, countless others).

Like most recurring problems in media, there is a regular solution to which many writers will resort to keep a story fresh and the action intense.  If your series bad guy simply isn’t bad enough, just introduce an even more heinous villain into the mix.  With dark enough intentions and a scheme that threatens the world on a massive scale, the previous antagonist may even step up to help the hero save the day.  This just happens to be the case in the Mega Man: Gigamix comics. Continue reading A Darker Shade of Blue

The Birth of Mega Man

Looking across my bookshelves and boxes of video game comics, you can find a near-equal amount of art books dedicated to my electronic obsession.  These books serve two functions in my apartment (other than looking pretty): provide a source of reference for my wife’s art and to serve as a sort of history book for my favorite games.  And the best of these tomes of video game knowledge come from Udon Comics.

On top of their numerous video game comics, the Ontario-based studio has published several art books dedicated to many different series.  Not content to simply provide the usual concept and promotional art from video games, Udon will fill these books with creator interviews, unreleased images, and even some new material for rabid fans.  During a recent re-reading of Mega Man: Official Complete Works, I discovered a rare comic that I somehow missed on my previous scouring: an official origin story for the Blue Bomber drawn by Keiji Inafune! Continue reading The Birth of Mega Man

The Spoils of Free Comic Book Day!

Another year, another successful day of free comics.  Since 2002, the first Saturday in May has been a special time when anyone who walks into participating stores walks out with special comics at no charge.  My local shop was a packed house from the start of the event.  A line filled with men, women, and tons of kids in superhero costumes wrapped around the store, each of them eager to scoop up some free comics.

Most of the bigger companies had special issues of their series available for pickup.  Most notably, Marvel had several tie-ins to their upcoming Guardians of the Galaxy movie.  However, plenty of non-superhero comics were also ready with free issues.  Adventure Time and The Simpsons, Smurfs and Grimm Fairy Tales; even the Power Rangers had a comic at no charge!  But as most of our regular readers would assume, I was there for the video game comics. Continue reading The Spoils of Free Comic Book Day!

The Blue Bomber at his Best

One of the earliest articles I threw up here on Geek Force Network concerned a very odd (and lackluster) comic book that reimagined Mega Man as a junior high school student.  While this comic tried to break out of the usual story presented in the Mega Man series, the plot fell into yet another trope-filled rut and lost the support of fans by removing most of the iconic elements from the games.  It was a far cry from what I hope for in a comic book adaptation.

Ideally, a comic book adaptation should expand on the plot and characters featured in a video game.  There should be fresh perspectives on the stories we have grown up playing, or brand new adventures in which we can become immersed.  There could be humorous side tales with lesser-explored characters, or bonus content like creator interviews or fan art from professional illustrators.  The comic would serve as a standalone product that could entice readers to try out the games, as well as a loving tribute to its source material for fans to pour over.

In other words, every comic book creator should look to Mega Man Megamix for inspiration. Continue reading The Blue Bomber at his Best