Tag Archives: wrath of the lich king

Why Garrosh is just what WoW needs

garrosh featured

If you have only the faintest interest in the lore of Warcraft, you will know about what’s going on in World of Warcraft right now. Essentially, Garrosh Hellscream has gone bananas with power, and after alienating, like,  the entire Horde, has decided to start his own Horde (not so much with hookers and blackjack, but with Old Gods and Sha) and will be the final boss in the next big patch, dubbed Siege of Orgrimmar. Take a look at the trailer if you haven’t already, and bask in Garrosh’s madness.

Garrosh is kinda a poor guy, isn’t he? His life is actually one big sob story, He never knew his father (who’s life was also not that unemotional), was considered a weakling until his coming-of-age, and has been portrayed by the community as the worst option for Warchief. Heck, even a basic campfire was more popular! It kinda sucks to be Garrosh. Though you might say most of the recent hate is due to his really stupid actions (and yes, he’s been portrayed as a power-hungry moron through most of Mists of Pandaria), he was already extremely unpopular in late Wrath of the Lich King and Cataclysm. Understandable, considering his warmongering nature, but I want to take this chance and tell you why Garrosh is just the thing Warcraft needs.

First of all, Garrosh is an instigator of conflict. Having him as Warchief ensures that the conflict between the Alliance and the Horde remains an important part of the story. This is in turn important, since it supports an important part of the game. If absolutely everything would be sunshine and rainbows between Blue and Red, why is there still so much fighting? Well, Garrosh’s racist attitude and lust for a long, bloody war is the reason. All you PvP’ers should thank him already: without him, Arathi Basin would be used as a summer retreat for aging Night Elf couples. Ew, the thought alone…

Second, Garrosh foresaw his own grand failure. When we meet him Nagrand, Garrosh is depressed and doubts his abilities to lead his tribe. Why? Because he thinks he will “repeat the mistakes of his father”. Understandable, but back then, we thought he might be that kind of character who redeems the family honor and steps into Thrall’s righteous and wise footsteps. Well, we were wrong, and Garrosh was right: he is repeating the mistakes of his father. He allows himself to be filled by both an earthly (his hatred and anger) and a supernatural (the Sha) force, corrupting him to his Orcish bones. There’s no redemption for house Hellscream here, only another dark stain on their bloodline.

Finally, Garrosh creates so much change. As I described in my first argument, the axe-swinging dictator loves himself some conflict and isn’t afraid of crushing his opposition. He has slain the Tauren’s chieftain, has pissed off Vol’jin and most of the other intelligent beings of Azeroth. His actions force others into action, which opens up so many possibilities. For a moment, it seemed like Jaina could convince the Blood Elves to join the Alliance. This was only possible because Garrosh had created a really hostile environment for them in the Horde. Now imagine all the other possibilities his madness opens up. Who might unite against him? Which unlikely allies find in him a common enemy? Who might return from his absence to re-unite the Horde? Yes, he’s a bloodthirsty homicidal maniac, but he leaves plot hooks and potential for interesting drama in his wake.

Don’t just simply hate on Garrosh Hellscream because all the cool kids do it. Take it from a guy who has left WoW behind now, and just believe in the importance of this wacky Warchief for the plot and coolness of Warcraft.